About

Melbourne Boston 30 Year Ambassadors

As part of the 2015 celebrations of Melbourne and Boston's 30 year sister cities relationship, the MBSCA has named a number of leaders connected with both cities as Melbourne Boston 30 Year Ambassadors.

This page features profiles the Melbourne Boston 30 Year Ambassadors and their connections with the two cities. 



Robert Doyle

Lord Mayor of Melbourne


 
 

Bob Anderson

2010 Hugh Rogers Fellow,
ImmusanT

Lauren Ayton

2013 Hugh Rogers Fellow,
Centre for Eye Research Australia

Amanda Caples

Victorian Government


 
 

Sue Dahn
Pitcher Partners

Susan de Weger

2014 Hugh Rogers Fellow,
French Horn Player

John W.H. Denton AO

Corrs Chambers Westgarth

 
 

Sara James
NBC Universal

Xenia Hanusiak

2011 Hugh Rogers Fellow,
Visiting Scholar, Columbia University

Christine Healey

2013 Hugh Rogers Fellow,
Shrine of Remembrance

     
Andrea Hull AO
VCA and MCM

Nerida Mellerick
2013 Hugh Rogers Fellow,
Clifton Hill Primary School

Emily Rochette
2014 Hugh Rogers Fellow,
Melbourne Girls' College

   
Peter Rogers
International Consultants Centre

Michael Rowland
ABC News

Helen Steel
Co-Chair, MBSCA




Natalie Thorne
2014 Hugh Rogers Fellow,
Melbourne Genomics Health Alliance

Robert Trenberth AM
Co-Chair, MBSCA

Gemma Turvey
2014 Hugh Rogers Fellow,
New Palm Court Orchestra


   
Leonie Walsh
Lead Scientist of Victoria

Peter Yates AM
Myer Family Investments




Ambassadors and their connections with Melbourne and Boston


Lauren Ayton
Centre for Eye Research Australia

My time as a Hugh Rogers Fellow in Boston in 2014 was one of the most rewarding in my career – I was able to spend two months working with my collaborator Professor Joseph Rizzo at Harvard on our work, and formed new collaborations and friendships. Boston is one of my favourite places in the world, and reminded me of Melbourne in so many ways. It is clear why they are sister cities, and I believe the strong relationship between them will continue to flourish over the years.


Sue Dahn
Pitcher Partners

The strong connection between Melbourne and Boston is felt in the shape and feel of the cities and, in particular, their educational institutions. My time at Harvard University rivals my time at Melbourne University for inspirational teaching and learning.


Nerida Mellerick

2012 Hugh Rogers Fellow

Nerida Mellerick was awarded the 2012 Hugh Rogers Fellowship for her interest in pursuing research in the field of Gifted and Talented education. She holds a Bachelor of Education from The University of Melbourne and works at Clifton Hill Primary School. Nerida’s time in Cambridge at Harvard University led her to a greater understanding of how to provide Gifted and Talented students with the complexity and challenge that they require. Nerida has since pursued her interest in a 21st century ‘understanding based’ curriculum, allowing her students to grapple with complexity whilst sustaining engagement.

As Nerida visited Boston shortly after the Boston bombing terrorist attack in 2013, she witnessed an entire city in a time of change, resolve and incredible strength – the motto of ‘Boston strong’ truly captured the feeling of the time. She remembers Boston as being “a city steeped in history but very much living in the present”. Nerida was particularly impressed by Boston’s architecture and the complementary nature of the old and new. Whilst in Boston Nerida applied her learning at Harvard to her own travel experience – she consciously focused on slow looking and observation to learn deeply.


Emily Rochette

2014 Hugh Rogers Fellow

Emily Rochette is a classroom teacher at Melbourne Girls’ College in Richmond and guest lecturer at the The University of Melbourne Graduate School of Education. Fewer young women engage with and continue in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects not only in Australia but also in the United States. Understanding how educators scaffold students toward a growth mindset in the context of developing ‘21st century skills’ is a timely issue to explore to understand ways students can more successfully engage with content. Emily travelled to Boston on the Hugh Rogers Fellowship to visit secondary schools as well as Boston University and Simmons College to learn about integration of technology in science subjects. The Woodward School for Girls, Dexter Southfield School and Dana Hall opened their doors to share their unique and engaging science and technology curricula. Discussions with staff and observations of students engaging in subjects such as Engineering highlighted similar issues with technology implementation in Boston and Melbourne. These experiences also highlighted opportunities for technology implementation across the whole school for Melbourne Girls’ College and their City Edge Network to consider. Emily left Boston with some pertinent questions for future investigation including: What are the benchmarks for being able to claim schools are ‘doing’ STEM? Why should educators employ technology as a solution to problems? Emily continues to work with colleagues to deliver a government education to young women in Science through integration of technology while maintaining contacts in the Boston area.

 

Michael Rowland

ABC News

Michael Rowland is the co-presenter of ABC News Breakfast on ABC1 and ABCNews24. He is a former ABC Washington correspondent, covering stories ranging from the 2008 presidential election to the eruption of the global financial crisis. He has also reported from Indonesia, Cuba and India. Michael spent five years covering federal politics and was the ABC’s Victorian political correspondent during the Kennett and Bracks years. He also has extensive experience covering business and economics. Michael is President of the Melbourne Press Club.



Leonie Walsh

Victorian Government Lead Scientist

Leonie Walsh was appointed to the inaugural role of Victorian Lead Scientist in mid-2013.  In this capacity Leonie represents Victoria on a range of advisory bodies including the Forum of Australian Chief Scientists and the Future Industries Ministerial Advisory Council helping to address strategic issues facing the technology sector and providing input into future strategies to help support jobs and economic growth in the State. 


Prior to taking on these positions Leonie had accumulated more than 25 years of technology leadership experience in a broad range of industrial applications both locally and globally in companies such as Dow Chemical, Henkel and Visy with a focus on the development and commercialization of technology. 


Boston has been a target city for technology collaboration in several of the roles both whilst spending 4 years based out of Texas with Dow Chemical and also since being back in Australia with Visy.  There is a breadth and richness of technology, talent and business process to be gained from collaborations with a diverse range of organizations in Boston and also a level of comfort in styles or engagement.